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Buildings - Background on buildings sector and current fossil fuel consumption 11 Items

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Building sector energy use, 2009

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-building_sector_energy_use
Electricity is 75% of primary energy consumed by U.S. buildings, but 68% of that electricity is lost in conversion and delivery. Oil and natural gas are almost 10 quads of energy, or 25% of total primary energy.

 

Buildings’ energy expenditures vs. other U.S. expenditures as percentage of 2008 GDP

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-Buildings_energy_expenditures_vs_US_expenditures_2008GDP
Americans spent more than 3% of the nation's GDP in 2008 on building heating, cooling, and lighting—almost two-thirds of the entire defense budget and more than federal government spending on Medicare.

 

Where does the money go

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-where_does_the_money_go
Despite large aggregate expenditures on buildings, average U.S. consumers spend only ~4% of their total budget on fuel and electricity bills. Consumers have little incentive to reduce their energy bills, despite a variety of ways to do so profitably.

 

Category expenses by building type for commercial sector

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-commercial_building_category_expenses
For commercial buildings, energy and water are 22% of total operating expenses.

 

Distribution of U.S. commercial building stock by size

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-distribution_US_commercial_building_stock
Most commercial buildings are small—73% of commercial buildings are less than 10,000 square feet. However, 35% of floorspace is in the largest 2.2% of buildings (100,000 square feet or larger).

 

Building energy use and square footage, 1950–2006

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-building_energy_use_sq_footage
Both building energy use and total square footage have steadily increased in the United States since 1950. Total building energy use has almost quadrupled, due to increases in building number and size, as well as the adoption of such energy-intensive technologies as color televisions, computers, and air conditioning.

 

Historical building energy use intensity

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-historical_building_energy_use_intensity
Since 1980, the energy use intensity of U.S. commercial buildings has dropped 16%, while in residential it has dropped 35%.

 

Changes in residential and commercial building codes, 1975–2011

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-Changes_residential_commercial_building_codes
Residential and commercial codes require increases in building efficiency, and can help drive the transition to a more efficient economy. Recent and significant changes to the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) 2012 and the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) 90.1-2010 require decreases of 15% and 25% in energy use from a 1975 baseline, respectively.

 

Gaps in building codes (residential & commercial)

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-Gaps_in_building_codes
Inadequate policies fail to realize the potential of energy efficiency. Residential building is easily influenced by codes, but federal and state policies rarely encourage efficiency.

 

Gaps in building codes (residential & commercial) (slide 2 of 2)

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-Gaps_in_building_codes_2
Inadequate policies fail to realize the potential of energy efficiency. Residential building is easily influenced by codes, but federal and state policies rarely encourage efficiency.

 

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