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Energy Efficiency : The Rest of the Iceberg

Report or White Paper, 2016
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/Iceberg
In 2014, Shell commissioned Amory Lovins to write a paper for its book The Colors of Energy www.shell.com/colours] commemorating the centenary of Shell’s Amsterdam Technical Centre, then to present its thesis at the ceremony, where it was warmly received. Its thesis: energy efficiency is a huge, cheap, often expanding-returns, and widely underestimated resource. The resulting risk: suppliers can run their supertanker into the iceberg of efficiency and sink without even knowing what they hit, because they weren’t properly tracking it and it wasn’t on their chart.

 

Energy Savings from Window Shades

Report or White Paper
http://www.rmi.org/EnergySavingsFromWindowShades_FinalWebReport

Windows are a primary contributor to heating and cooling loads in U.S. residences, due to conductive heat loss in the heating season and unwanted conductive and solar heat gain in cooling season. Insulating window shades, can reduce window heat transfer, and if used effectively, reduce unwanted solar heat gain without reducing useful winter solar heat gain. Using test data provided by Hunter Douglas, RMI evaluated the potential energy savings of three Hunter Douglas products in representative new and existing houses in the US, through detailed whole building energy simulation. In addition, using the energy simulation model, we quantified several other benefits, including thermal comfort, potential for HVAC equipment downsizing, and electricity demand reductions.

 

Energy Retrofit Guide for Caribbean Hospitals: A reference guide on deep energy retrofits for Caribbean hospital administrators

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/RMI_2015_CaribbeanHospitalRetrofitGuide


This guide was developed to provide healthcare administrators in the Caribbean islands the resources necessary to find energy savings for their facilities, finance those savings, and follow through with the activities necessary to realize those savings.

The guide has an accompanying website (www.hospitalretrofits.org) that serves as an easy-to-use tool to break through the barriers of complex engineering and financing models; and gets to real and actionable savings that can be tailored to a specific facility.

Authored jointly by Arup, Carbon War Room, the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, and Rocky Mountain Institute, the guide supports the mission to accelerate the adoption of busi- ness solutions that reduce carbon emissions and advance the low-carbon economy. It should be noted this work would not be possible without a number excellent industry texts that set out clear processes for implementation and wider guidance. A full list of references is outlined in Appendix B.

 

Deep Energy Retrofits Using Energy Savings Performance Contracts: Success Stories

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/DeepEnergyRetrofitsUsingESPC

Energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) have become a key mechanism for energy efficiency upgrades in recent years, with the federal market now exceeding $1 billion in gross annual revenue. ESPCs allow federal agencies to partner with an energy service company (ESCO) in order to complete energy savings projects without upfront capital costs or Congressional appropriations.

This report showcases eight case studies that highlight best practices in federal ESPCs. Highlighted projects— including seven federal and one municipal project— cumulatively exceed 600 billion BTUs in energy savings, with an average 58% energy use reduction.

 

The Economics of Demand Flexibility: How "Flexiwatts" Create Quantifiable Value for Customers and the Grid

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/RMI-TheEconomicsofDemandFlexibilityFullReport

Here, we analyze demand flexibility’s economic opportunity. In the residential sector alone, widespread implementation of demand flexibility can save 10–15% of potential grid costs, and customers can cut their electric bills 10–40% with rates and technologies that exist today. Roughly 65 million customers already have potentially appropriate opt-in rates available, so the aggregate market is large and will only grow with further rollout of granular retail pricing.

 

Practice Guide: The Path to a Deep Energy Retrofit Using an Energy Savings Performance Contract

Guide, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-02_Path_to_DR_using_ESPC

Seven key steps will help owners reach deeper energy savings through Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs). ESPCs are partnerships between a Federal agency and an energy service company (ESCO) that allow Federal agencies to complete energy-savings projects without upfront capital costs or special Congressional appropriations.

 

How to Calculate and Present Deep Retrofit Value

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2014-07_RMI-DRVReportHiRes

Energy efficiency building retrofits in the United States and around the world are attractive investments, but receive far less attention and capital than they deserve. This is in part due to a narrow definition of their value, typically focused on energy cost savings alone, and in part due to confusion and uncertainty about how to calculate, present, and justify such value as part of a retrofit capital request. This guide addresses this confusion and uncertainty, providing practical guidance to enable real estate investors to incorporate all the benefits of efficiency retrofits into their decision making.

 

How to Calculate and Present Deep Retrofit Value (Executive Summary)

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-08_RMI-DRVReportHiRes

Energy efficiency building retrofits in the United States and around the world are attractive investments, but receive far less attention and capital than they deserve. This is in part due to a narrow definition of their value, typically focused on energy cost savings alone, and in part due to confusion and uncertainty about how to calculate, present, and justify such value as part of a retrofit capital request. This guide addresses this confusion and uncertainty, providing practical guidance to enable real estate investors to incorporate all the benefits of efficiency retrofits into their decision making.

 

Energy Efficiency and Net-Zero Buildings: GSA & RMI Answer the Call (Executive Summary)

Conference Proceedings, Guide, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/GSAPtoPWS2015-Exec Summ

THE GSA’S COMMITMENT


The nation’s largest landlord is answering President Obama’s call to pursue deep energy savings and netzero energy in buildings. Earlier this spring, the President and Congress each issued directives that extended aggressive energy efficiency goals into the next decade, drawing attention to topics like net-zero energy and promoting sustainability more broadly in the federal government.1 Shortly after these mandates were passed, the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) and Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) held the 2015 Practice Into Performance Workshop, convening the GSA, a variety of other federal agencies, and private energy service companies (ESCOs) to help the federal government achieve deeper energy savings through performance contracting. The event provided the perfect platform for all stakeholders to share past successes, acquire new tools, and break down barriers to achieve deep energy savings.

Translating deep energy retrofit best practices into performance is easier said than done, as demonstrated by the relatively low level of savings delivered from energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) throughout the federal government, 19 percent on average2

. Research and experience demonstrates that we can retrofit buildings economically to deliver much deeper energy, cost, and carbon savings.

 

Energy Efficiency and Net-Zero Buildings: GSA & RMI Answer the Call (Executive Summary)

Conference Proceedings, Presentation, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/GSAPtoPWS2015-ExecSumm

THE GSA’S COMMITMENT


The nation’s largest landlord is answering President Obama’s call to pursue deep energy savings and netzero energy in buildings. Earlier this spring, the President and Congress each issued directives that extended aggressive energy efficiency goals into the next decade, drawing attention to topics like net-zero energy and promoting sustainability more broadly in the federal government.1 Shortly after these mandates were passed, the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) and Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) held the 2015 Practice Into Performance Workshop, convening the GSA, a variety of other federal agencies, and private energy service companies (ESCOs) to help the federal government achieve deeper energy savings through performance contracting. The event provided the perfect platform for all stakeholders to share past successes, acquire new tools, and break down barriers to achieve deep energy savings.

Translating deep energy retrofit best practices into performance is easier said than done, as demonstrated by the relatively low level of savings delivered from energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) throughout the federal government, 19 percent on average. Research and experience demonstrates that we can retrofit buildings economically to deliver much deeper energy, cost, and carbon savings.

 

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