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Listed below are all documents and RMI.org site pages related to this topic.
Energy and Resources - Biofuel & Biomass Combustion 13 Items

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Micropower Database 2014 (July)

Guide, 2014
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2014-18_MicropowerDatabase

2014 (July) Edition: The purpose of the micropower database is to present a clear, rigorous, and independent assessment of the global capacity and electrical output of micropower (all renewables, except large hydro, and cogeneration), showing its development over time and documenting all data and assumptions. With minor exceptions, this information is based on bottom-up, transaction-by-transaction equipment counts reported by the relevant suppliers and operators, cross-checked against assessments by reputable governmental and intergovernmental technical agencies. For most technologies, historic data runs from 1990 through 2013. Available information includes installed capacity (GW) and electricity generation (TWh/y) per generating technology. The Micropower Database Methodology is also included in this ZIP-file. For previous versions, please see the 2008 Micropower Database (RMI ID E05-04) and the 2010 (May) Edition (RMI ID 2010-06).

 

2010 Micropower Database (May)

Guide, 2010
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2010-06_MicropowerDatabase
2010 (May) Edition: The purpose of the micropower database is to present a clear, rigorous, and independent assessment of the global capacity and electrical output of micropower (all renewables, except large hydro, and cogeneration), showing its development over time and documenting all data and assumptions. With minor exceptions, this information is based on bottom-up, transaction-by-transaction equipment counts reported by the relevant suppliers and operators, cross-checked against assessments by reputable governmental and intergovernmental technical agencies. For most technologies, historic data from 1990 through 2008 or 2009 is available, as well as forecasts through 2013. Available information includes global annual capacity additions and output, global cumulative capacity, and capacity factor. The Micropower Database Methodology is also included here. The 2008 Micropower Database (RMI ID E05-04) is also available.

Note: A more recent version of The Micropower Database from September 2010 (RMI ID 2010-14) is now available. This update to the database incorporates recently released data that change the total installed micropower capacity by 2.9%.

 

2010 Micropower Database (September)

Guide, 2010
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2010-14_MicropowerDatabaseSeptember2010

2010 (September) Edition: The purpose of the micropower database is to present a clear, rigorous, and independent assessment of the global capacity and electrical output of micropower (all renewables, except large hydro, and cogeneration), showing its development over time and documenting all data and assumptions. With minor exceptions, this information is based on bottom-up, transaction-by-transaction equipment counts reported by the relevant suppliers and operators, cross-checked against assessments by reputable governmental and intergovernmental technical agencies. For most technologies, historic data from 1990 through 2008 or 2009 is available, as well as forecasts through 2013. Available information includes global annual capacity additions and output, global cumulative capacity, and capacity factor. The Micropower Database Methodology is also included here. The 2008 Micropower Database (RMI ID E05-04) and the 2010 (May) Edition (RMI ID 2010-06) are also available.

Note: This update to the database incorporates recently released data that change the total installed micropower capacity by 2.9%.

 

RMI's Top Federal Energy Policy Goals

Report or White Paper, 2009
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-01_FederalEnergyPolicyGoals

This 19-page memo to the Obama administration outlines 17 goals that can reduce U.S. oil use and greenhouse gas emissions each by 50% in 10 years. These policies would also create over three million jobs in the next four years, and earning a profit for the nation in under 25 years. The recommendations include both demand and supply side goals in multiple sectors (buildings, transportation, industrial, electricity and heat, and liquid fuels). The recommendations also contain five overarching goals: the Smart Grid is installed, enhancing energy security, enabling distributed resources, and integrating electrified vehicles; better electricity end-use data are available; a new corps of workers is trained to power the clean energy economy; all energy subsidies are consistently reviewed, transparently displayed, and thoroughly addressed; and government purchasing power spurs the clean energy economy.

 

2008 Micropower Database: How Distributed Renewables and Cogeneration are Beating Nuclear Power Stations — Supporting Data, Methodology, and Graphs

Guide, 2008
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-04_MicropowerDatabase
2008 Edition: The purpose of the micropower database is to present a clear, rigorous, and independent assessment of the global capacity and electrical output of micropower (all renewables, except large hydro, and cogeneration), showing its development over time and documenting all data and assumptions. With minor exceptions, this information is based on bottom-up, transaction-by-transaction equipment counts reported by the relevant suppliers and operators, cross-checked against assessments by reputable governmental and intergovernmental technical agencies. For most technologies, historic data from 1990 through 2005 or 2006 is available, as well as forecasts through 2010. Available information includes global annual capacity additions and output, global cumulative capacity, and capacity factor. The Micropower Database Methodology is also included here. The 2010 Micropower Database (September) (2010-14) contains the most recent data.

 

Getting Off Oil: Recent Leaps and Next Steps

Journal or Magazine Article, 2008
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E08-02_GettingOffOilRecentLeaps
This article is a 2008 update on the progress of RMI's 2005 effort to implement Winning the Oil Endgame. In this article, Amory Lovins provides an update on recent progress in many of the sectors targeted in Winning the Oil Endgame. He also describes the steps required to implement the strategy fully in the auto industry.

 

Preface to the Chinese Edition of Winning the Oil Endgame

Book or Book Chapter, 2008
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E08-03_ChineseWTOEPreface
In the preface to the Chinese edition to Winning the Oil Endgame, Amory Lovins puts the book in context for the Chinese audience. Winning the Oil Endgame offers a strategy for ending US oil dependence.

 

Nuclear Power and Climate Change

Letter, 2007
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/C07-09_NuclearPowerClimateChange
This 2007 e-mail exchange between Steve Berry (University of Chicago), Peter Bradford (former U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissioner and senior utility regulator), and Amory Lovins illustrates the cases for and against nuclear power in relation to climate and the environment.

 

Framework for Community Sustainability: Ten Ingredients for Long-Term Success

Guide, 2007
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/ER03-18_TenIngredientsLongTermSuccess
The Framework for Community Sustainability was derived from the experiences of North American communities that understand that community, economy, and environment are not competing interests, but complementary parts of a whole. It outlines the components of smart and sustainable community governance, suggesting how to weave sustainability into the public, private, and nonprofit fabric of a community. [Originally published in 2003; updated in 2007]

 

Winning the Oil Endgame

Book or Book Chapter, 2004
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E04-07_WinningTheOilEndgame

This independent, peer-reviewed synthesis for American business and military leaders charts a roadmap for getting the United States completely, attractively, and profitably off oil. Our strategy integrates four technological ways to displace oil: using oil twice as efficiently, then substituting biofuels, saved natural gas, and, optionally, hydrogen. This route for the transition beyond oil will expand customer choice and wealth, and will be led by business for profit. In order to download a complimentary PDF of the complete book, please sign in or register now to receive your username and password.

 

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