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Energy and Resources 249 Items

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Energy Efficiency : The Rest of the Iceberg

Report or White Paper, 2016
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/Iceberg
In 2014, Shell commissioned Amory Lovins to write a paper for its book The Colors of Energy www.shell.com/colours] commemorating the centenary of Shell’s Amsterdam Technical Centre, then to present its thesis at the ceremony, where it was warmly received. Its thesis: energy efficiency is a huge, cheap, often expanding-returns, and widely underestimated resource. The resulting risk: suppliers can run their supertanker into the iceberg of efficiency and sink without even knowing what they hit, because they weren’t properly tracking it and it wasn’t on their chart.

 

Micropower Database 2015

Guide, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/MicropowerDatabase

2015 Edition: The purpose of the micropower database is to present a clear, rigorous, and independent assessment of the global capacity and electrical output of micropower (all renewables, except large hydro, and cogeneration), showing its development over time and documenting all data and assumptions. With minor exceptions, this information is based on bottom-up, transaction-by-transaction equipment counts reported by the relevant suppliers and operators, cross-checked against assessments by reputable governmental and intergovernmental technical agencies. For most technologies, historic data runs from 1990 through 2014. Available information includes installed capacity (GW) and electricity generation (TWh/y) per generating technology. The Micropower Database Methodology is also included in this ZIP-file. The Micropower Database Methodology is also included in this ZIP-file. For previous versions, please see the 2008 Micropower Database (RMI ID E05-04), the 2010 (May) Edition (RMI ID 2010-06), and the 2014 (July) Edition (RMI ID 2014-18).

 

Battery Balance of System Charrette: Post-charrette Report

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-01_RMIBatterBoS Charrette Report-20150204-Final

The overall objective of RMI’s Battery Balance of System work is to foster the development of collaborative efforts between energy storage stakeholders that: 1) Drive down non-cell costs of behind-the-meter energy storage systems 2) Expand the value proposition of behind-the-meter energy storage systems

 

Preliminary Strategy Summary Supporting Fort Collins' Climate Action Plan (CAP)

Presentation, Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-03_FortCollinsCAPTacticsSummarydd

This document includes a high level summary of strategies that can be used to achieve a greenhouse gas emissions reduction goal of 80% by 2030 (2005 baseline) in the city of Fort Collins.

 

The Electricity System Value Chain

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-04_eLab-ElectricitySystemValueChain-final

The Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) has developed a framework that describes the major activities required for the electricity grid to function. Because the grid system network is not a linear value chain it becomes more difficult to see how a node can be removed or where new value can be created. By using the visual framework via the process provided, it becomes possible to explore the potential value streams of a given technology in an organized fashion. Wouldn’t this type of framework anchor you in current paradigm thinking and encumber the creative process? Even at the highest level of disruption the end goal remains the same; electrical power needs to get to the equipment that needs power. In this manner, the constraints of the framework apply and steps can be removed as appropriate for the given technology. The electricity grid of the future is one that will require the advancement of many emerging technologies. It is crucial that these technologies understand themselves in order to find their place to fit in and belong to the system and add maximum value.

 

The Economics of Load Defection: How Grid-Connected Solar-Plus-Battery Systems Will Compete with Traditional Electric Service, Why it Matters, and Possible Paths Forward

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-05_RMI-TheEconomicsOfLoadDefection-FullReport

In particular, we sought to answer two core questions:
1. Lowest-Cost Economics: When grid-connected customers have the option to source their entire load either from a) the grid, b) a solar- plus-battery system, or c) some combination of the grid, solar PV, and batteries, how does that configuration change over time based on lowest-cost economics for the customer? And how do the relative contributions of grid- and self-sourced electricity change over time to meet customer load?

2. Implications: What are the potential implications for utilities, third-party solar and battery providers, financiers/investors, customers, and other electricity system stakeholders? And what opportunities might be found in grid-connected solar-plus-battery systems?

 

The Economics of Load Defection: How Grid-Connected Solar-Plus-Battery Systems Will Compete with Traditional Electric Service, Why it Matters, and Possible Paths Forward (Executive Summary)

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-06_RMI-TheEconomicsOfLoadDefection-ExecSummary

In particular, we sought to answer two core questions:
1. Lowest-Cost Economics: When grid-connected customers have the option to source their entire load either from a) the grid, b) a solar- plus-battery system, or c) some combination of the grid, solar PV, and batteries, how does that configuration change over time based on lowest-cost economics for the customer? And how do the relative contributions of grid- and self-sourced electricity change over time to meet customer load?

2. Implications: What are the potential implications for utilities, third-party solar and battery providers, financiers/investors, customers, and other electricity system stakeholders? And what opportunities might be found in grid-connected solar-plus-battery systems?

 

The Economics of Battery Energy Storage: How Multi-use, Customer-sited Batters Deliver the Most Services and Value to Customers and the Grid (Executive Summary)

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/RMI-TheEconomicsOfBatteryEnergyStorage-ExecutiveSummary
Utilities, Regulators, and private industry have begun exploring how battery-based energy storage can provide value to the U.S. electricity grid at scale. However, exactly where energy storage is deployed on the electricity system can have an immense impact on the value created by the technology. With this report, we explore four key questions: 1. What services can batteries provide to the electricity grid? 2. Where on the grid can batteries deliver each service? 3. How much value can batteries generate when they are highly utilized and multiple services are stacked? 4. What barriers - especially regulatory - currently prevent single energy-storage systems or aggregated fleets of systems from providing multiple, stacked services to the electricity grid, and what are the implications for major stakeholder groups?

 

The Economics of Battery Energy Storage: How Multi-use, Customer-sited Batters Deliver the Most Services and Value to Customers and the Grid

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/RMI-TheEconomicsOfBatteryEnergyStorage-FullReport
Utilities, Regulators, and private industry have begun exploring how battery-based energy storage can provide value to the U.S. electricity grid at scale. However, exactly where energy storage is deployed on the electricity system can have an immense impact on the value created by the technology. With this report, we explore four key questions: 1. What services can batteries provide to the electricity grid? 2. Where on the grid can batteries deliver each service? 3. How much value can batteries generate when they are highly utilized and multiple services are stacked? 4. What barriers - especially regulatory - currently prevent single energy-storage systems or aggregated fleets of systems from providing multiple, stacked services to the electricity grid, and what are the implications for major stakeholder groups?

 

The Economics of Battery Energy Storage: How Multi-use, Customer-sited Batters Deliver the Most Services and Value to Customers and the Grid (Technical Appendix)

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/RMI-TheEconomicsOfBatteryEnergyStorage-Appendices
Utilities, Regulators, and private industry have begun exploring how battery-based energy storage can provide value to the U.S. electricity grid at scale. However, exactly where energy storage is deployed on the electricity system can have an immense impact on the value created by the technology. With this report, we explore four key questions: 1. What services can batteries provide to the electricity grid? 2. Where on the grid can batteries deliver each service? 3. How much value can batteries generate when they are highly utilized and multiple services are stacked? 4. What barriers - especially regulatory - currently prevent single energy-storage systems or aggregated fleets of systems from providing multiple, stacked services to the electricity grid, and what are the implications for major stakeholder groups?

 

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