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Listed below are all documents and RMI.org site pages related to this topic.
Energy and Resources 239 Items

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Battery Balance of System Charrette: Post-charrette Report

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-01_RMIBatterBoS Charrette Report-20150204-Final

The overall objective of RMI’s Battery Balance of System work is to foster the development of collaborative efforts between energy storage stakeholders that: 1) Drive down non-cell costs of behind-the-meter energy storage systems 2) Expand the value proposition of behind-the-meter energy storage systems

 

Preliminary Strategy Summary Supporting Fort Collins' Climate Action Plan (CAP)

Presentation, Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-03_FortCollinsCAPTacticsSummarydd

This document includes a high level summary of strategies that can be used to achieve a greenhouse gas emissions reduction goal of 80% by 2030 (2005 baseline) in the city of Fort Collins.

 

The Electricity System Value Chain

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-04_eLab-ElectricitySystemValueChain-final

The Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) has developed a framework that describes the major activities required for the electricity grid to function. Because the grid system network is not a linear value chain it becomes more difficult to see how a node can be removed or where new value can be created. By using the visual framework via the process provided, it becomes possible to explore the potential value streams of a given technology in an organized fashion. Wouldn’t this type of framework anchor you in current paradigm thinking and encumber the creative process? Even at the highest level of disruption the end goal remains the same; electrical power needs to get to the equipment that needs power. In this manner, the constraints of the framework apply and steps can be removed as appropriate for the given technology. The electricity grid of the future is one that will require the advancement of many emerging technologies. It is crucial that these technologies understand themselves in order to find their place to fit in and belong to the system and add maximum value.

 

The Economics of Load Defection: How Grid-Connected Solar-Plus-Battery Systems Will Compete with Traditional Electric Service, Why it Matters, and Possible Paths Forward

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-05_RMI-TheEconomicsOfLoadDefection-FullReport

In particular, we sought to answer two core questions:
1. Lowest-Cost Economics: When grid-connected customers have the option to source their entire load either from a) the grid, b) a solar- plus-battery system, or c) some combination of the grid, solar PV, and batteries, how does that configuration change over time based on lowest-cost economics for the customer? And how do the relative contributions of grid- and self-sourced electricity change over time to meet customer load?

2. Implications: What are the potential implications for utilities, third-party solar and battery providers, financiers/investors, customers, and other electricity system stakeholders? And what opportunities might be found in grid-connected solar-plus-battery systems?

 

The Economics of Load Defection: How Grid-Connected Solar-Plus-Battery Systems Will Compete with Traditional Electric Service, Why it Matters, and Possible Paths Forward (Executive Summary)

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2015-06_RMI-TheEconomicsOfLoadDefection-ExecSummary

In particular, we sought to answer two core questions:
1. Lowest-Cost Economics: When grid-connected customers have the option to source their entire load either from a) the grid, b) a solar- plus-battery system, or c) some combination of the grid, solar PV, and batteries, how does that configuration change over time based on lowest-cost economics for the customer? And how do the relative contributions of grid- and self-sourced electricity change over time to meet customer load?

2. Implications: What are the potential implications for utilities, third-party solar and battery providers, financiers/investors, customers, and other electricity system stakeholders? And what opportunities might be found in grid-connected solar-plus-battery systems?

 

Transactive Energy

Guide, 2014-41
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2014-41_TransactiveDiscussionv2

The session explored how platforms can enable value exchange of DER, both vertically to the distribution and bulk power system, as well as horizontally through bilateral transactions from distributed resources.

 

integrated Utility Service Model

Guide, 2014
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2014-50_FCUpresentation

This session reviewed the work that Fort Collins Utilities did to develop a new business model titled, “Integrated Utility Services” (IUS). In the IUS model, the utility would deliver integrated packages of solar and efficiency to customers using on-bill repayment and delivering savings from day 1. This business model would diversify the utility’s business model by providing new revenue from service charges for the solar and efficiency, while at the same time delivering savings to customers.

Fort Collins Utilities has been working on this e-Lab project for over a year, and shared a draft of their final report. In attendance were representatives from SMUD, Avista, Duke, ConEd, and others. The goal was to have a practical discussion about how these and other utilities could deliver new services to their customers in this or similar ways, and to provide structured feedback to FCU and RMI on the proposed IUS business model for Fort Collins.

 

European Perspectives

Guide, 2014
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2014-38_eLab Oct82014-aEuropeanPerspective

Caroline Hillegeer from GdF Suez shared her perspective on the European distributed energy landscape (see attached slides), along with insightful contributions from others familiar with the European situation.

 

e-Lab Inducement Prize: Background Research

Guide, 2014
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2014-37_X PrizeFraming20140929

The purpose of this session was to further scope a potential project to launch an e-Lab “X-Prize” (name likely to be changed) that would offer a cash reward for solving a tough problem faced by the electricity sector related to eLab’s core issues. The group was very enthusiastic about the idea as a means of driving interest and excitement in these issues, but has agreed to further scoping and due diligence are needed before a go/no-go decision can be made.

 

Micropower Database 2014 (July)

Guide, 2014
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2014-18_MicropowerDatabase

2014 (July) Edition: The purpose of the micropower database is to present a clear, rigorous, and independent assessment of the global capacity and electrical output of micropower (all renewables, except large hydro, and cogeneration), showing its development over time and documenting all data and assumptions. With minor exceptions, this information is based on bottom-up, transaction-by-transaction equipment counts reported by the relevant suppliers and operators, cross-checked against assessments by reputable governmental and intergovernmental technical agencies. For most technologies, historic data runs from 1990 through 2013. Available information includes installed capacity (GW) and electricity generation (TWh/y) per generating technology. The Micropower Database Methodology is also included in this ZIP-file. For previous versions, please see the 2008 Micropower Database (RMI ID E05-04) and the 2010 (May) Edition (RMI ID 2010-06).

 

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