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Energy and Resources - Smart Grid & Electric Transmission 18 Items

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Micropower Database 2015

Guide, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/MicropowerDatabase

2015 Edition: The purpose of the micropower database is to present a clear, rigorous, and independent assessment of the global capacity and electrical output of micropower (all renewables, except large hydro, and cogeneration), showing its development over time and documenting all data and assumptions. With minor exceptions, this information is based on bottom-up, transaction-by-transaction equipment counts reported by the relevant suppliers and operators, cross-checked against assessments by reputable governmental and intergovernmental technical agencies. For most technologies, historic data runs from 1990 through 2014. Available information includes installed capacity (GW) and electricity generation (TWh/y) per generating technology. The Micropower Database Methodology is also included in this ZIP-file. The Micropower Database Methodology is also included in this ZIP-file. For previous versions, please see the 2008 Micropower Database (RMI ID E05-04), the 2010 (May) Edition (RMI ID 2010-06), and the 2014 (July) Edition (RMI ID 2014-18).

 

The Economics of Battery Energy Storage: How Multi-use, Customer-sited Batters Deliver the Most Services and Value to Customers and the Grid (Executive Summary)

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/RMI-TheEconomicsOfBatteryEnergyStorage-ExecutiveSummary
Utilities, Regulators, and private industry have begun exploring how battery-based energy storage can provide value to the U.S. electricity grid at scale. However, exactly where energy storage is deployed on the electricity system can have an immense impact on the value created by the technology. With this report, we explore four key questions: 1. What services can batteries provide to the electricity grid? 2. Where on the grid can batteries deliver each service? 3. How much value can batteries generate when they are highly utilized and multiple services are stacked? 4. What barriers - especially regulatory - currently prevent single energy-storage systems or aggregated fleets of systems from providing multiple, stacked services to the electricity grid, and what are the implications for major stakeholder groups?

 

The Economics of Battery Energy Storage: How Multi-use, Customer-sited Batters Deliver the Most Services and Value to Customers and the Grid

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/RMI-TheEconomicsOfBatteryEnergyStorage-FullReport
Utilities, Regulators, and private industry have begun exploring how battery-based energy storage can provide value to the U.S. electricity grid at scale. However, exactly where energy storage is deployed on the electricity system can have an immense impact on the value created by the technology. With this report, we explore four key questions: 1. What services can batteries provide to the electricity grid? 2. Where on the grid can batteries deliver each service? 3. How much value can batteries generate when they are highly utilized and multiple services are stacked? 4. What barriers - especially regulatory - currently prevent single energy-storage systems or aggregated fleets of systems from providing multiple, stacked services to the electricity grid, and what are the implications for major stakeholder groups?

 

The Economics of Battery Energy Storage: How Multi-use, Customer-sited Batters Deliver the Most Services and Value to Customers and the Grid (Technical Appendix)

Report or White Paper, 2015
http://www.rmi.org/RMI-TheEconomicsOfBatteryEnergyStorage-Appendices
Utilities, Regulators, and private industry have begun exploring how battery-based energy storage can provide value to the U.S. electricity grid at scale. However, exactly where energy storage is deployed on the electricity system can have an immense impact on the value created by the technology. With this report, we explore four key questions: 1. What services can batteries provide to the electricity grid? 2. Where on the grid can batteries deliver each service? 3. How much value can batteries generate when they are highly utilized and multiple services are stacked? 4. What barriers - especially regulatory - currently prevent single energy-storage systems or aggregated fleets of systems from providing multiple, stacked services to the electricity grid, and what are the implications for major stakeholder groups?

 

Micropower Database 2014 (July)

Guide, 2014
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2014-18_MicropowerDatabase

2014 (July) Edition: The purpose of the micropower database is to present a clear, rigorous, and independent assessment of the global capacity and electrical output of micropower (all renewables, except large hydro, and cogeneration), showing its development over time and documenting all data and assumptions. With minor exceptions, this information is based on bottom-up, transaction-by-transaction equipment counts reported by the relevant suppliers and operators, cross-checked against assessments by reputable governmental and intergovernmental technical agencies. For most technologies, historic data runs from 1990 through 2013. Available information includes installed capacity (GW) and electricity generation (TWh/y) per generating technology. The Micropower Database Methodology is also included in this ZIP-file. For previous versions, please see the 2008 Micropower Database (RMI ID E05-04) and the 2010 (May) Edition (RMI ID 2010-06).

 

The Economics of Grid Defection: When and Where Distributed Solar Generation Plus Storage Competes with Traditional Utility Service (4-Pager)

Fact-sheet or One-pager, 2014
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/RMI_GridDefection-4pager_2014-06

4 Page fact sheet detailing the spiral of falling sales and rising electricity prices that make defection via solar-plus systems even more attractive and undermine utilities' traditional business models

 

The Economics of Grid Defection: When and Where Distributed Solar Generation Plus Storage Competes with Traditional Utility Service

Report or White Paper, 2014
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/RMIGridDefectionFull_2014-05

Though many utilities rightly see the impending arrival of solar-plus-battery grid parity as a threat, they could also see such systems as an opportunity to add value to the grid and their business models. The important next question is how utilities might adjust their existing business models or adopt new business models—either within existing regulatory frameworks or under an evolved regulatory landscape—to tap into and maximize new sources of value that build the best electricity system of the future at lowest cost to serve customers and society. These questions will be the subject of a forthcoming companion piece.

 

Reinventing Fire: Three Energy Gamechangers for China and the World

Journal or Magazine Article, 2013
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2014-08_ReinventingFire-ThreeEnergyGamechangersforChinaandtheWorld

 

eLab Annual Report 2012-2013

Annual Report, 2013
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2013-14_eLabAnnualReport

In its first year, eLab made significant strides towards building the capacity of change agents in the electricity sector, fostering the development of new ideas and solutions, and engaging directly with leaders to test and implement new ideas that can ultimately scale broadly throughout the industry.

 

Reinventing Fire Electricity Sector Methodology

Report or White Paper, 2011
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2011-14_RFelectricitysectormethodology

This document provides an overview of Reinventing Fire’s electricity sector analysis with a focus on the methodologies and inputs of NREL’s ReEDS and RMI’s dispatch model. The document is divided into two main sections. The first section provides a high-level overview of the ReEDS model and details of RMI’s assumptions that served as ReEDS inputs. Please note: This section relies heavily on NREL’s forthcoming documentation, Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS). This document will be updated when NREL makes its updated ReEDS documentation available. NREL’s documentation provides a detailed explanation of the ReEDS objective function, approach, algorithms, and common assumptions, including important information regarding generation and demand resource inputs, such as renewable resource potential. RMI’s documentation details key inputs or variables that differ from those described in NREL’s own documentation of ReEDS. The second section documents RMI’s dispatch model.

 

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