Text Size AAA Bookmark and Share

Search

Listed below are all documents and RMI.org site pages related to this topic.
Industry 24 Items

First Previous 1 2 3 Next Last 

U.S. industry energy-saving potential, 2010–2050

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-US_industry_energy_saving_potential
Increased adoption of energy efficient technologies as well as cogeneration and waste heat recovery systems will reduce energy use by an additional 4.7 quadrillion BTUs from business-as-usual. These and other changes (energy changes due fuel switching or transformation in other sectors) can reduce projected primary energy use by 27% in 2050.

 

Primary energy consumption in U.S. industry

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-Primary_energy_consumption_US_industry
Energy use for U.S. industry is conventionally projected to grow from 24.4 quads in 2010 to 30.5 quads in 2050.

In 2010, more than four-fifths of energy use in U.S. industry came from fossil fuels. Natural gas is the dominant source of energy (~35%).

 

Primary energy intensity of U.S. manufacturing industries, 2010

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-Primary_energy_intensity_US_manufacturing
Industry has a huge variety of subsectors that differ markedly in energy consumption and intensity (energy used per $ of shipment).

 

U.S. industrial primary energy intensity vs. shipments, 2010

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-US_industrial_energy_intensity_vs_shipments
This chart depicts the 2010 primary energy intensities of U.S. industry by subsector versus shipments.

 

Emerging energy efficient technologies in industry

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-Emerging_energy_efficient_technologies
Based on Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) technology reports, a number of measures were considered for adoption. This table features a sampling of these measures, with information on each measure’s technical potential, associated energy savings, and cost.

 

U.S. price vs. rated efficiency of 250–hp motors

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-US_price_vs_rated_efficiency_250_hp_motors
Premium-efficiency motors are normally assumed to cost more because they use more and better copper and iron. Yet analysis of all models on the 2010 U.S. market, in this case for 250 hp (TEFC, NEMA Type B) shows this is untrue despite standards’ having knocked the least efficient models off the market.

 

Technologies that convert waste heat to electricity

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-Technologies_convert_waste_heat_to_electricity
Based on a Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) report on technologies that generate electricity from waste heat (and other waste energy sources), our analysis adopted the options summarized in the table.

 

Estimates for combined heat and power and waste heat recovery

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-Estimates_CHP_waste_heat_recovery
RMI analysis predicts a net increase of industrial combined heat and power (CHP) installations of 109 GW, split between traditional cogeneration units and waste heat recovery to electricity systems.

 

Steel use for automaking, 2010–2050

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-Steel_use_for_automaking
The shift from steel to carbon fiber in the transportation sector reduces steel production. With the rapid adoption of lightweight vehicles, RMI estimates that, in 2050, the auto industry will require one-fifth the steel used in 2010.

 

Energy use for steel sector, 2010–2050

http://www.rmi.org/RFGraph-Energy_use_for_steel_sector
Projected reduction in U.S. steel demand will reduce the energy required by the industrial sector by 111 trillion BTU/y in 2050.

 

First Previous 1 2 3 Next Last 
 
Show Subscribe