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Listed below are all documents and RMI.org site pages related to this topic.
Security 55 Items

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Stepping Up: Benefits and Cost of Accelerating Fort Collins' Energy and Climate Goals

Report or White Paper, 2014
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/80FortCollinsReport-WEB_2014-02

This report examines the opportunity for accelerating Fort Collins’ energy and climate goals to reflect the community’s values, and capture economic, social, and environmental benefits. In the five years since Fort Collins initially established its current greenhouse gas emissions goals, rapid changes in the cost and availability of clean, energy efficient technologies, together with the emergence of new business models and financing methods for implementing these measures, have dramatically shifted the solutions space for addressing the community’s energy needs. The cost of solar panels, for example, has fallen nearly 75% since 2008, with further dramatic declines yet to come; the retail price for energy- efficient LED lightbulbs has fallen by 50% in the past year. These and other changes have opened the door for the City to implement new solutions to reduce emissions and waste, stimulate local economic development, improve security, and reduce risk. This analysis indicates that, in the accelerated scenario, Fort Collins can achieve an approximate 80% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2030, two decades ahead of its existing 2050 greenhouse gas reduction target. In doing so, the community could: • reduce building energy use by 31% through efficiency, • achieve a carbon neutral electricity system by 2030, and • reduce transportation energy use by 48%.

 

Advancing Military Microgrids

Report or White Paper, 2013
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2013-15_NavyReport

The U.S. Navy is leading the way in the technical and economic testing and validation of microgrid technology as it looks for new ways to bolster the energy security on Naval bases. Much of the Navy’s leadership in this area will emanate from demonstrations happening on its U.S. bases located in the Southwest. As these bases begin to experiment with the technology, they face several major questions around microgrid design, evaluation, economics, and operation. To begin to address these questions, NAVFAC Southwest worked with e-Lab on the design and execution of a two-day workshop April 16–17, 2013. Drawing on key stakeholders from inside the Navy and experts from outside, the workshop team identified five findings: NAVFAC Southwest is still developing a strategy to implement energy security goals stated by the Department of the Navy, Current approaches to renewable energy procurement place emphasis on utility-scale resources, which may not support efforts to bolster energy security through microgrids, Investment in expanding controls presents a near-term opportunity to begin to build toward microgrids while mitigating price risk, Microgrids connected at the distribution level are likely to incur high transaction costs to enable participation in electricity markets, Several entrenched barriers must be addressed to enable microgrid adoption across the Navy

 

Currents Spotlight on Rocky Mountain Institute

Interview, 2012
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-03_CurrentsInterview

In this interview in Currents, the Navy's energy and environmental magazine, Amory Lovins shares his ideas for an enduring and resilient Department of Defense.

 

A Farewell to Fossil Fuels: Answering the Energy Challenge

Journal or Magazine Article, 2012
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels

In this article published in Foreign Affairs, Amory Lovins describes a U.S. transition from fossil fuels--a blueprint detailed in Reinventing Fire-- that requires pursuing three agendas. First, radical automotive efficiency can make electrification affordable and save fuel in heavy vehicles; and all vehicles can be used more productively. Second, new designs can make buildings and factories several times more efficient than they are now. Third, modernizing the electric system to make it diverse, distributed, and renewable can also make it clean, reliable and secure. Getting the U.S. off fossil fuels would transform its foreign policy, and turbocharge global development. He argues that we don't have to wait for congress to seize these opportunities.

This article is also available to read at Foreign Affairs.

 

Response to RADM Robert G. James (USNR Ret.)'s 2 August 2011 Wall Street Journal op-ed "Of Mustard Fuel and Marines"

Letter, 2011
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2011-10_ResponseToRobertJames
Former Naval and CIA officer and oil-industry executive Robert James claimed that military interest in advanced biofuels is a green fad and compromises combat effectiveness. Amory Lovins, who's helped to lead military energy reform for three decades, corrects Dr. James's misconceptions and misrepresentations in this comment posted on 3 August 2011 to his op-ed.

 

Proliferation, Oil, and Climate: Solving for Pattern

Journal or Magazine Article, 2010
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2010-02_ProliferationOilClimatePattern
In this essay Amory Lovins discusses the problems of proliferation, oil, and climate. These three formidable problems, though treated as distinct, share common causes and solutions. New energy and climate solutions can strengthen security and prosperity by shifting strategy for the NPT Review Conference. Nuclear power’s astonishing eclipse by cheaper, faster, more climate-protective competitors—if acknowledged and exploited—can simultaneously bolster nonproliferation, energy security, global development, and climate protection, all at a profit. Foreign Policy published a condensed version of this paper, "On Proliferation, Climate, and Oil: Solving for Pattern" (RMI document ID S10-03) in January 2010.

 

On Proliferation, Climate, and Oil: Solving for Pattern

Journal or Magazine Article, 2010
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2010-03_ForeignPolicyProliferationClimateOilPattern
Proliferation, climate change, and oil dependence share both nuclear non-solutions that frustrate U.S. foreign-policy goals and non-nuclear solutions that can achieve them. This synthesis of all three issues shows how reconciling foreign with domestic energy policy can solve these and other big problems at a profit. This essay, first posted 21 January 2010 in Foreign Policy, is expanded in the annotated paper,"Proliferation, Oil, and Climate: Solving for Pattern" (RMI document ID S10-02).

 

DOD’s Energy Challenge as Strategic Opportunity

Journal or Magazine Article, 2010
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2010-05_DODsEnergyChallenge
This unabridged version of an April 2010 article published in Joint Force Quarterly, the magazine of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, describes how two big ideas—endurance and resilience—can turn the DoD's energy costs and vulnerabilities into sources of breakthrough advantage, major savings in blood and treasure, and a safer world. The article as it appeared in Joint Force Quarterly (RMI document ID 2010-07) is available to download here.

 

Nuclear Power: Climate Fix or Folly?

Report or White Paper, 2009
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E09-01_NuclearPowerClimateFixOrFolly
This semi-technical article, summarizing a detailed and documented technical paper (see "The Nuclear Illusion" (2008)), compares the cost, climate protection potential, reliability, financial risk, market success, deployment speed, and energy contribution of new nuclear power with those of its low- or no-carbon competitors.

 

Climate: Eight Convenient Truths

Journal or Magazine Article, 2009
http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-12_ClimateEightConvenientTruths
In this article from Roll Call, Amory Lovins provides eight arguments for congress to pass climate change legislation.

 

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