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Jesse Morris

Principal

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  • Disruptive Technologies

Jesse Morris is a Principal in the Electricity Practice of the Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI).  Throughout his career in the electricity sector, Jesse has had one focus: partner with utilities, technology providers, developers, and regulatory stakeholders to help distributed energy resources become an integral, widely-accessible part of the global electricity system. Currently, Jesse leads RMI’s work with the Energy Web Foundation, a new nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating development and deployment of blockchain technology in the energy sector.

Jesse’s research, convening, and consulting work focuses on understanding the fundamental economics of distributed energy resources and their ability to provide a wide variety of services to the grid through regulatory change and new business models. Over the past several years, he and his colleagues have researched and published in detail RMI’s findings on the economics of battery storage, advanced demand response technologies, and solar plus storage systems in addition to helping large corporates build new business models focused on the grid-edge.

BACKGROUND

Jesse Morris graduated from Colorado College with a degree in International Environmental Policy. Before joining RMI, Jesse worked at the Aspen Institute where he focused on convening multi-stakeholder groups to explore climate change adaptation and mitigation challenges and opportunities. Prior to this role, Jesse pursued his interest in renewable energy and efficiency with PV Powered (now Advanced Energy), a grid-tied photovoltaic inverter manufacturer.

EDUCATION

Bachelor of Arts, International Environmental Policy, Magna Cum Laude, Colorado College (2009)

LOCATION

Basalt, CO

TWITTER HANDLE

@ja_morris

Authored Works
Outlet Blog Post

Blockchain in Energy: Powered by EWF

Energy Web Foundation (EWF) is proud to announce the release of our organization’s open-source blockchain. Blockchains are distributed public databases that securely record digital transactions without a central clearinghouse, and are best known from digital currencies like Bitcoin. The code and client for Tobalaba, EWF’s test network, were published…

Outlet Blog Post

The Energy Web Foundation: Bringing Blockchain Technology to the Grid

Blockchain technology—the technology underpinning the Bitcoin virtual currency—is being discussed as one of the most potentially disruptive technologies since the Internet. Blockchains are a combination of information technology, cryptography, and governance principles that enables transactions to occur without the need for a third party to establish trust between…

Outlet Blog Post

Report Release: Renewable Microgrids

For island communities, the costs and risks associated with oil dependence paired with cost reductions in solar, wind, and energy storage technologies suggest that an alternative to the fully oil-based electricity systems of the past is now a viable option for communities across the globe: affordable renewable energy.

Outlet Blog Post

Hawaii just ended net metering for solar. Now what?

Earlier this week, the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission (PUC) issued a ruling ending net energy metering (NEM) for all new solar customers in the state. Now, new customers will have a choice to make between two new tariffs: a “grid-supply” option and a “self-supply” option. (More on their details…

Outlet Blog Post

Tesla Hitting the Battery Accelerator

No one knows for certain what lower-priced batteries means for the grid. Readily available, cheap storage is certainly capable of changing the grid as we know it, but other factors will all play an important role in the relevance of batteries moving forward.

insight

The Economics of Demand Flexibility: How “Flexiwatts” Create Quantifiable Value for Customers and the Grid (Executive Summary)

In this report we analyze demand flexibility’s economic opportunity. In the residential sector alone, widespread implementation of demand flexibility can save 10–15% of potential grid costs, and customers can cut their electric bills 10–40% with rates and technologies that exist today. Roughly 65 million customers already have potentially appropriate opt-in…

insight

The Economics of Demand Flexibility: How “Flexiwatts” Create Quantifiable Value for Customers and the Grid

In this report we analyze demand flexibility’s economic opportunity. In the residential sector alone, widespread implementation of demand flexibility can save 10–15% of potential grid costs, and customers can cut their electric bills 10–40% with rates and technologies that exist today. Roughly 65 million customers already have potentially appropriate opt-in…