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Titiaan Palazzi

Sr. Associate

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  • Shine

As project manager on Rocky Mountain Institute’s Shine Program, Titiaan helps small utilities, municipalities, and corporates to procure 0.5–5 MW solar at much lower costs, making clean energy affordable to more North Americans. Titiaan is responsible for Shine’s projects in Texas and the Southeast (including North Carolina).

BACKGROUND

Titiaan joined Rocky Mountain Institute in 2014, as Special Aide to Amory Lovins. Before moving to Colorado, Titiaan founded Cool Schools, an initiative to install solar PV on elementary schools; and Kairos Society the Netherlands, a network of young, impact-driven entrepreneurs. As an engineering undergraduate student, Titiaan co-founded Bodega Ksi, a high-end catering company.

Titiaan briefly worked with Nest Labs to develop product specs for the German market; with FirstFuel Software on data science and interface design; and with Infosys to identify opportunities for energy efficiency and onsite renewables in India.

Titiaan loves to foster environments in which people can learn. He has co-taught energy seminars at Stanford University, Olin College, and MIT; and led a hackathon at MIT Medialab’s India Initiative in Mumbai. He is a founding team member of Spokes America, an annual cross-U.S. bicycle trip in which college students teach hands-on engineering classes to teenagers.

EDUCATION & AWARDS

M.Sc., Sustainable Energy Technologies,Delft University of Technology and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

B.Sc., Civil Engineering, Delft University of Technology and ETH Zürich

LOCATION

New York City

TWITTER HANDLE

@titiaan_palazzi

WHY I LOVE WORKING AT RMI

“I am inspired by the joy and commitment with which RMI colleagues spend each day fully focused on accelerating the shift to a clean energy economy.”

Authored Blog Posts

Solar Embrace

More than a year ago, Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) announced its Shine Program would focus on community-scale solar. We claimed that community-scale solar could be procured at costs close to utility-scale solar, unlocking a 5–30 GW market by 2020. However, we could not have predicted the success of our initial…

Micropower’s Quiet Takeover

In a cover story and article 14 years ago about the emergent disruption of utilities, The Economist’s Vijay Vaitheeswaran coined the umbrella term “micropower” to mean sources of electricity that are relatively small, modular, mass-producible, quick-to-deploy, and hence rapidly scalable—the opposite of cathedral-like power plants that cost billions…